Tagged: Fun trips

America’s Lighthouse

OBX, where coastal legends are born – Part 4 – Hatteras Island, Stop 1 … Estimated reading time: 6 minutes – SBFL 18* – PLANNING TO VISIT – On my last post, I talked about a walking waterway. This time, how about talking about a candy-striped lighthouse that also walked? These are some of the many fascinating legends of the Outer Banks.   After leaving our boat Life’s AOK in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, our planning for our 320-mile land excursion southward on the Outer Banks (OBX) barrier islands continues. With the mighty Atlantic Sea on our left and the extensive inland waters of the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds on our right, we planned to visit the Northern Islands. After that came Roanoke Island with all...

What happened at Roanoke Island?

OBX, where coastal legends are born – Part 2 – Roanoke Island … Estimated reading time: 10 minutes – SBFL 16* – PLANNING TO VISIT – We are continuing to follow the footsteps of Dorothea and Stuart E. Jones in their 1958 National Geographic article titled, “Slow Boat to Florida,” (SBFL), and the 1973 book of Allan C. Fisher, Jr., published by National Geographic, titled, “America’s Inland Waterway.” In our previous post, in Part 1, we planned to leave our boat, Life’s AOK, in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, and do a multi-day excursion to the Outer Banks (OBX) on the path of the Jones’. As per Fisher’s notes, he did not stop by the Outer Banks. From Elizabeth City, he headed straight to cross the...

Ah, Virginia … Inspired by history and adventure

Estimated reading time – 10 minutes – SBFL 12*  – PLANNING TO VISIT – It was a balmy spring Thursday on April 26 on the Virginia shores. After 4½ months at sea, some 104 people from Britain, horses, and supplies landed on Cape Henry to establish the first permanent English-speaking colony in the New World, North America. The year was 1607. As a Smithsonian Magazine article puts it, “One ebullient adventurer later wrote that he was “almost ravished” by the sight of the freshwater streams and ‘faire meddowes and goodly tall trees’ they encountered when they first landed at Cape Henry. After skirmishing with a band of Natives and planting a cross, the men of the Virginia Company expedition returned to their ships—the Susan Constant,...

Baltimore Inner Harbor—mingle with history, enjoy the spirit of today

Estimated reading time: 15 minutes – SBFL 11* – PLANNED & VISITED – Baltimore is not the Maryland version of Georgetown in Washington, DC, nor of Williamsburg in Virginia, nor did the locals ever want it to be. Because of being a major port on the eastern seaboard, some say Baltimore was a sailor’s town throughout its history, up to the early 20th century—and Baltimore has a very long maritime history. Fells Point, located in a deeper section of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, was one of the earliest settlements, and was where the Clipper Ships were made. There are only a few places in the US that had that distinction. It was a working waterfront, with tugboats coming and going, major freighters stopped right at the...